Quick & Easy Tilt-Shift in the Photobucket Editor

Posted by on Apr 30, 2014 in Feature Updates, Stories, Tutorials | No Comments

Never heard of tilt-shift photos? Well, you’ve probably seen them.

Tilt-shift is a photography technique, often employed in the architectural photography, that takes advantage of selective focus. You’re probably more familiar with the technique being used to create a ‘miniaturized’ effect on cityscapes, stadiums, etc.

How to fake a tilt-shift photo with the Photobucket editor:

You can quickly and easily create a convincing miniature using just our editor with the following steps.

1. Pick a photo

Though there are all kinds of miniaturized photos at different angles, the best photos to use for our purposes will be those that have been taken from a high angle, looking down, and in daylight. This will help us create the illusion that we’re looking down at a miniature.

This tutorial will use this incredible photo of Mexico City, taken by Pablo López Luz.

2. Upload the image to Photobucket and launch our editor

In typical miniaturized tilt-shifted photos, there aren’t any cues that indicate the distance to objects, or how far they are from the lens, and so the distance has to be guessed by the viewer based on the size of familiar objects in the scene.

3. Crop

For this photo, we’ll get rid of some of that depth. Let’s begin by cropping the image down to limit our depth of field, using the crop tool.

Now it’s a bit more difficult to gauge distances, size, etc.

4. Focus

Now select the focus tool, then select the rectangle shape. This tool blurs everything outside of the two line. Pick a spot that makes sense, perhaps closer to the middle of the image, running from side to side.

As with photographing miniatures, there is only so much we can capture in one photo – the foreground will be blurry, as will the background, when we’re focusing on a particular part of a miniature. The focus tool will help create a false sense of depth, like we’re photographing a miniature.

5. Saturate and Illuminate

Saturating the image will help the colors pop and look more vivid. This will further help our illusion by making the things within the photo look more like painted ‘toys’.

Use your own judgement and play around with the saturation tool. Combining that with the enhance tool can produce some convincing effects!

6. Share!

Once your masterpiece is finished, save the image and get to sharing!

 

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